The Arthropod Series: Part I, The Praying Mantis Knocks

lostpineslife

The Arthropod Series

A bright green and yellow spider spinning webs on the Yellow Bells by the gate caught my eye on Saturday morning.   That prompted the attachment of a macro lens to my camera, and a hunt in the fields for colorful spiders.  The successful spider expedition set the arthropod theme for the weekend; highlights include close encounters with a Praying Mantis and a huge and hungry dragonfly.

The spiders show up in Part III.  The most cooperative subject, the Praying Mantis gets Part I.

The Praying Mantis Knocks

We don’t have many surprise visitors out at Little Piney,

but this Praying Mantis made it to the front door without the gate code.

Can an insect be curious about us?  He seemed friendly and engaged.

Praying Mantis Visits Little Piney, Bastrop TX
Praying Mantis Knocks

 

We visited on the front porch awhile.

He has a great shadow.

Praying Mantis Visits Little Piney, Bastrop, TX
Praying Mantis and Shadow

The fun really started when Ken came outside.

They shook hands.

Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis and Pine Cone

He decided to sit and visit for awhile.

 

Praying Mantis Visits Little Piney, Bastrop, TX
Praying Mantis Sits on Ken’s Hand

 

He posed for photos.

Praying Mantis Visits Little Piney, Bastrop, TX
Hello, Praying Mantis

Played some piano tunes.

Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis Playing Tunes

 

Tap danced to “Me and My Shadow”

 

Praying Mantis at Little Piney
Me and My Shadow

 

 

 

Ken tried to put him down in a bush

but he didn’t know what to do with himself.

 

Praying Mantis at Little Piney, Bastrop TX
Praying Mantis Doesn’t Like the Bush

 

 

Ken rescued him.

He was very glad to climb back on Ken’s arm.

Praying Mantis at Little Piney, Bastrop TX
Praying Mantis Back on Ken’s Hand

We had to go inside, but Praying Mantis found a way to keep

track of his new friend, Ken, through the window screen.

Praying Mantis at Little Piney, Bastrop TX
Praying Mantis on the Window Screen

 

Interesting Facts About the Praying Mantis

  • The praying mantis uses those long front legs to snatch prey quicker than wink.  Those spikes pin the meal in place so it can’t escape.
  • The female may eat a male just after mating.
  • Hundreds of eggs hatch young that are mini versions of mom and dad.
  • Praying mantis are the most common pet insect.
  • The commonly held belief that they spit on humans is not true.

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